Upcoming talk about technology at the table

This Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 3 PM, Dr. Anne Fishel will be joining Understood Expert Chat along with Tali Horowitz from Common Sense Media to discuss technology at the table. Join if you can!

https://www.understood.org/en/community-events/experts-live-chats-webinars/2016/december/06/device-free-dinners-helping-kids-manage-screentime

Dr. Fishel at the 92Y’s Parenting Conference

Dr. Fishel talked about the importance of story-telling at the dinner table at the 92Y’s annual parenting conference on April 17, 2016. The conference was entitled, “Parenting: What you Bring to the Table,” and also featured Drs. Michael Thompson and Kyle Pruett, as well as the actor Hank Azaria on fatherhood.

She was featured in a Q and A in New York Family about her talk: http://www.newyorkfamily.com/why-family-dinners-are-so-important/

 

The Greenfield, MA Recorder Covers Dr. Fishel’s Visit

familywithteensAfter Dr. Fishel’s recent lecture to Communities that Care in Franklin County, MA, the local news recapped her visit with an article in the Greenfield Recorder.

As the article relates, “In Franklin County, the most recent annual survey of teens shows that 58 percent of teens report that they have dinner with their families four or more nights a week — and that among those teens, there’s a dramatic correlation with lower use of alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana, a lower risk of depression and stronger connections with parents, along with a higher consumption of fruit.” Building upon that local research and the numerous other studies that have shown the benefits of family dinner for both children and adults, Dr. Fishel gave a talk to school and human services workers who deal directly with families to encourage them to help their clients make dinnertime a priority.

Read the account of Dr. Fishel’s lecture and community dinner in The Greenfield Recorder.

Dr. Fishel on the Live Happy Podcast

smilingpieRecently, Dr. Fishel was honored to appear as a guest on the Live Happy podcast, talking about family dinners and discussing her book with listeners. In the episode, Dr. Fishel offers research, wisdom and advice about:

  • Why regular family dinners are great for the body, brain and the spirit
  • Tips for thriving conversation around the dinner table
  • Why playing with your food is beneficial to mental health
  • Ideas to overcome picky eaters, busy schedules and tension at the table

Listen to the podcast on the Live Happy site.

Five Myths About Family Dinners

kitchenfurnitureEach year, more than 9 in 10 Americans gather around the table with family and friends for Thanksgiving. But only 50 percent of us eat with our family on a regular basis. That’s too bad. Twenty years of research has shown that family dinners are great for the brain (enhancing preschool vocabulary and raising test scores), body (improving cardiovascular health in teens and lowering the odds of obesity) and spirit (reducing rates of behavioral problems, stress and substance abuse). But in extolling the virtues of the family dinner, we may have obscured what the meal is actually about and why it serves parents and children. In that gap lies a thick stew of myths.

1. Teens don’t want to eat with their parents
2. Family dinners are anti-feminist
3. Family dinners depend on a homemade meal
4. Families don’t have time to pull it off
5. Food fights make family dinners impossible

Read the article in full and find out what Dr. Fishel has to say about these five common family dinner myths on The Washington Post.